Request an Appointment Today!
Fax: (212) 774-2895
New York, NY 10019

In patients treated for focal cartilage defects of the knee with osteochondral grafts, these values can be used to define a clinically important change and substantial clinical benefit for future outcome studies. In this study population, higher preoperative activity levels and a history of 1 or less previous ipsilateral knee surgeries were predictive of achieving a clinically important change and substantial clinical benefit after OAT/OCA. These findings have implications for

OCA in elite basketball players results in an 80% return to previous level of competition, which is consistent with previous reports of athletes playing other sports. Osteochondral allografting is a reasonable option to consider for full-thickness cartilage lesions of the knee, even for elite jumping athletes.

Purpose To compare failure rates and clinical outcomes of osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-intact versus ACL-reconstructed knees at midterm follow-up. Methods After a priori power analysis, a prospective registry of patients treated with OCA for focal chondral lesions ≥2 cm2 in size with minimum 2-year follow-up was used to match ACL-reconstructed knees with ACL-intact knees by age, sex, and primary chondral defect location. Exclusion criteria included meniscus transplantation, realignment osteotomy, or

In conclusion, in this meta-analysis of 2549 athletes, cartilage restoration surgery had a 76 % return to sport at mid-term follow-up. Osteochondral autograft transfer offered a faster recovery and appeared to have a higher rate of return to preinjury athletics, but heterogeneity in lesion size, athlete age, and concomitant surgical procedures are important factors to consider when assessing individual athletes. This study reports on the rate of return to sport